Diamond Park; Butler, Pennsylvania

Diamond Park; Butler, Pennsylvania

Basics:  
Location: Downtown Butler, Pennsylvania
Year Built: 1803
Size: 190′ x 110′ (park only)
.5 Acre

Located at the precipice of a hill and across from the courthouse, this traditional town square is the focal point of the community.

Key Details:

The park is surrounded on four sides by buildings of various styles and uses.  The north and south sides are bordered by commercial buildings and the east side is contained by a church.  The park fronts Main Street on the west side, but the tall clock tower of the Butler County Courthouse provides the architectural focal point of the park.

The most significant monument is to the the City’s namesake, General Richard Butler, who was an officer in the Army in the Revolutionary War.  Butler was killed near Fort Recovery, Ohio in the ‘Battle on the Wabash’ in 1791.   This infamous battle saw Native Americans defeating the US Army in defense of their land as the fledgling United States expanded westward.  This was one of the most significant losses in US Army history and immortalized the two brilliant Native American leaders, Blue Jacket of the Shawnee and Little Turtle of the Miami.

Diamond Park contains a number of significant Veteran’s memorials.  One of the most personal memorials are brick pavers with the names of local veterans.  A World War II memorial was recently added as well.

Another important marker honors the development of the original “Jeep” of which Butler played a key role.  The Bantam Car Company of Butler was one of two automobile makers that responded to an Army request to develop a four wheel drive reconnaissance car for the impending Second World War.  Bantam built the first prototype in Butler and submitted it to the Army for approval.  Although it met nearly all requirements, the US Army felt that the Bantam company was too small to produce the vehicle and supplied the original design to the much larger Willys and Ford companies that went on to mass produce essentially the same design as that originally developed in Butler.  This unique bit of history has led the City to create the annual Bantam Jeep Heritage Festival which brings hundreds of Jeep enthusiasts to the city each year.

If You Go:

Located on Main Street, Diamond Park is easy to find and access.  There is on-street parking in the immediate vicinity and a number of other architectural gems in the immediate vicinity.  Butler has seen a recent resurgence in small businesses repopulating the Main Street corridor, check out some of the new eateries.

Sources:

http://www.fortrecoverymuseum.com/history

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